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15 For The Log Lady

The September edition of The Wire magazine (issue 403) features the chart “15 For The Log Lady“, inspired by the Twin Peaks Log Lady character portrayed by Catherine E. Coulson. This tracklist is made up of musical compositions that use logs, wood, timber, and trees as a primary source of sound.

 

15 For The Log Lady

Kate Carr – The creaking door of the abandoned concrete factory, Ólafsfjörður, Iceland (Helen Scarsdale Agency)

Anton Mobin – Floating Wood  (Green Field)

Bartholomäus Traubeck – Years (Bandcamp)

Limpe Fuchs – Holztrauer  (Play Loud!)

Jay-Dea Lopez – One tree in a forest: A field recording (soundslikenoise.org)

Junko & Thomas Tilly – Wild Protest N 48 54.339´/e 005 23.224´ (Vent Des Forêts)

Peter Brötzmann & Han Bennink – Aufen Nr. 4  (FMP)

Owl Project – Iloger (Soundcloud)

Bob Verschueren – Sequoia (Sequoia sempervirens) (Fuga Libera)

Laurie Anderson – Handphone table. Remembering Sound (MOMA)

Hazard – The Logfires (Ash International)

Greg Davis & Jeph Jerman – Matinee, New Plymouth (Autumn)

Wilmot MacDonald – The Lumberman’s Aphabet  (Smithsonian Folkways)

Annea Lockwood – Buoyant (Recital)

Mladen Kovacevic – Anplagd (Horopter Film Production)

 

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This is the second post in Sounding Out!’s 4th annual July forum on listening in observation of  World Listening Day on July 18th, 2015.  World Listening Day is a time to think about the impacts we have on our auditory environments and, in turn, their effects on us.  For Sounding Out! World Listening Day necessitates discussions of the politics of listening and listening, and, as Carlo Patrão shares today, an examination of sounds that disturb, annoy, and threaten our mental health and well being.   –Editor-in-Chief JS

An important factor in coming to dislike certain sounds is the extent to which they are considered meaningful. The noise of the roaring sea, for example, is not far from white radio noise (…) We still seek meaning in nature and therefore the roaring of the sea is a blissful sound. Torben Sangild, The Aesthetics of Noise

Read here: Misophonia: Towards a Taxonomy of Annoyance

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