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Zepelim, Charles Amirkhanian

This piece was produced for BBT Sun Radio and aired on Rádio Universidade de Coimbra (RUC) on July 6th, 2018. BBT Sun Radio is a radiophonic space dedicated to freeform radio and a celebration of our beloved friends and radio colleagues José Braga, Bruno Simões and João Terêncio. This hour is a travel-log of old and new interviews, radio cut-ups, collages and excursions on themes like deep time, sound, ecology, lucid dreaming, etc. Thanks to André Quaresma and Tiago André for the invitation and for curating this show.

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Music for Plants, Compilation.jpg

On June 28, I’ll be talking about Music for Plants at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, Colorado. This talk is part of an event series called 3 Things, Any 3 Things that mixes performance, lecture, and music. The tagline for the event reads: We bring you three experiences. We smash them together. We make no connections. Let’s see what happens. 

Alongside music for plants there will be a Hip hop harpist (Erin Newton) and a whiskey tasting (Ryan Negley). I’m pleased to do this lecture in the hometown of Dorothy Retallack, author of the book Sound of Music and Plants (1973), that famously spread the rumors that plants don’t have an ear for Led Zeppelin or Jimi Hendrix’s acid rock.

MCA, Denver Colorado, June 28:
Music for Plants + Whiskey + Hip Hop Harpist 
with Carlo Patrão, Ryan Negley, and Erin Newton

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Kalun Leung is a trombone player based in New York City. This interview was recorded during a visit to Freshkills Park in Staten Island organized by the sound artist John Roach, the designer Andrew Shea and their students from the New School. The group is developing a series of installations for the park that translate ecological data into sensory experiences. Freshkills Park, once the world’s largest landfill, is now being transformed into a public park three times the size of Central Park.

Kalun Leung
Sound the Mound

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DeepWirelessLarge

Zepelim’s radio piece Misophonia is included in the new Deep Wireless 13 radio art compilation curated by New Adventures in Sound Art (NAISA). This work explores the condition of Misophonia and the varying degrees of sonic annoyances that arise from bodily functions while also reflecting upon the ways in which this health issue has been covered by the media. Deep Wireless 13 features several radio pieces on the spectrum of electroacoustic and experimental sound art. The album was produced for the 17th edition of Deep Wireless Festival of Radio & Transmission Art taking place between January 17 and April 16, 2018. Pieces were selected from an international call for submissions on the theme Sonic Reflections.

“The Deep Wireless festival has been celebrating the art of the aural imagination since 2002 with annual performances, broadcasts, workshops and many special events. This year’s theme is Sonic Reflections. Reflections of South River that are broadcast out into the world and reflections of the world resonating in our memories and imagination.”— Darren Copeland, NAISA

Artistic Director: Darren Copeland
Executive Director: Nadene Thériault-Copeland
Image Illustration: Prashant Miranda

Deep Wireless 13 Radio Art Compilation:

Naisa

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15 For The Log Lady

The September edition of The Wire magazine (issue 403) features the chart “15 For The Log Lady“, inspired by the Twin Peaks Log Lady character portrayed by Catherine E. Coulson. This tracklist is made up of musical compositions that use logs, wood, timber, and trees as a primary source of sound.

 

15 For The Log Lady

Kate Carr – The creaking door of the abandoned concrete factory, Ólafsfjörður, Iceland (Helen Scarsdale Agency)

Anton Mobin – Floating Wood  (Green Field)

Bartholomäus Traubeck – Years (Bandcamp)

Limpe Fuchs – Holztrauer  (Play Loud!)

Jay-Dea Lopez – One tree in a forest: A field recording (soundslikenoise.org)

Junko & Thomas Tilly – Wild Protest N 48 54.339´/e 005 23.224´ (Vent Des Forêts)

Peter Brötzmann & Han Bennink – Aufen Nr. 4  (FMP)

Owl Project – Iloger (Soundcloud)

Bob Verschueren – Sequoia (Sequoia sempervirens) (Fuga Libera)

Laurie Anderson – Handphone table. Remembering Sound (MOMA)

Hazard – The Logfires (Ash International)

Greg Davis & Jeph Jerman – Matinee, New Plymouth (Autumn)

Wilmot MacDonald – The Lumberman’s Aphabet  (Smithsonian Folkways)

Annea Lockwood – Buoyant (Recital)

Mladen Kovacevic – Anplagd (Horopter Film Production)

 

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Good Things Mag is a documentarium series founded by Victoria Stöcker in Monterey, California. Each issue explores a theme through a number of art forms (articles, collage, photography, illustration, essays, poetry, etc). In Issue 2 (June 2017), Victoria gathered several contributors to reflect upon all the things we can learn from plants from a variety of viewpoints, such as the life of the tallest trees on Earth or the first plant harvested and consumed in space. I contributed to the article Plant Music with the collaboration of Victoria and Evan Crankshaw from the Flash Strap blog. In this article we survey the history of plant music and review the different ways in which musicians and sound artists have been using plants to create music.

Michael Prime, Mileece, Miya Masoaka, Joe Patitucci, Magz Hall, Mort Grason, John Cage and Roger Roger are a few of the artists included. Plant music practices are divided into generative music by plants, vegetative music by plants, music for plants and music about plants. The article expands on and updates some of the references featured in Zepelim’s installment Plant Consciousness and Communication

Good Things We Learn From Plants is a beautifully curated magazine full of gems about plant life and plant related art. You can order a copy here or visit Victoria Stöcker’s page here.

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April 30th, 2017 – It’s early afternoon on a Sunday when a small group of people starts to gather around a jug band playing near the Smith–Ninth Street subway station exit. Eli Smith, the co-founder of the Brooklyn Folk Festival and long time banjo player, welcomes everybody to this year’s edition of the Banjo Toss Competition, one of the most anticipated events of the three-day folk festival. The jug band leads the parade from the corner of Smith-Ninth Street to the Gowanus Canal, a federally designated Superfund site also known as the Brooklyn’s nautical purgatory. The rules are simple: whoever throws the banjo the furthest is the winner. But for everyone attending this ritual, throwing the banjo into the canal feels less like a competition and more like a moment of catharsis. Nevertheless, the banjo toss champion wins a brand new banjo. As a precaution, plastic gloves are provided to each participant to avoid contact with the polluted waters. Next, the banjo tossers test their throwing techniques, evaluate wind conditions, the jug band sets the rhythm, and the banjo finally makes its dive into the waters of the Gowanus Canal.

Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn

Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn

In this radio piece, Eli Smith guides us through the Banjo Toss, explaining its origins and mythos. Smith is a banjo player, writer, radio host, researcher and promoter of folk music. You can find more about his work and music here. Or visit the Brooklyn Folk Festival and the Jalopy Theatre & School of Music.

Brooklyn Folk Festival 2017

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